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Attractions

Pařížská Street

Pařížská Street, the ultimate bourgeois avenue, thanks to its location, has always belonged to the streets with a high concentration of luxurious shops, swanky cafés, restaurants and bars. This street runs off the Old Town Square to the Vltava River, it bisects the Jewish quarter and is an easy walk from some of the best five star hotels in Prague.

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Powder Tower

Work began on this sturdy Gothic tower in 1475, but was halted eight years later when rioting forced the king to flee the city. It still lacked a roof when Josef Mocker was asked to complete it in the 1870s.

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Rudolfinum

This venue presents a varied programme of classical music. Rudolfinum, built between 1876 and 1884, is an outstanding example of the Czech neo-renaissance style. Between the wars the building was used as the parliament, but today it is used for its original purpose - hosting art exhibitions, and various concert programmes and festivals all year round, including the Prague Proms and the International Festival of Classical Music.

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John Lennon Wall

During the 1980s John Lennon became the symbol for all Czech anti-government protesters, as they scribbled his lyrics and other political slogans on this now world famous wall. From famous quotes like “give peace a chance” through to personal sentiments from the individuals living through this period ...

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The SS Cyril and Methodius Orthodox Cathedral

During 1942, 7 Czech partisans, who were involved in the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, hid from the Nazi army in this cathedral. The story behind this is the stuff of legend. It is extremely moving going to see the wreath-covered tomb, where the partisans attempted to resist efforts to flood and smoke them out.

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Letná and Prague Metronome

Letná plain is a high flat terrain above the city. Letná plain has long been the traditional assembly point for invading and besieging armies, as well as sports and other cultural events. Under the Communists, it was used primarily for the annual May Day parades, during which thousands trudged past …

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Wallenstein Palace

Wallenstein Palace was the first large building of the Baroque style to be constructed in Prague, and was constructed by Albrecht von Wallenstein, who died in 1634. He was a military commander who won many victories over the Protestants in the 30 Years War and he was soon seen as indispensable to Emperor Ferdinand II. The titles he received weren’t enough for him though; he had eyes for the crown of Bohemia.

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Sternberg Palace

Sternberg Palace is open for the public after the reconstruction in the years 2002 and 2003. The palace houses permanent exposition of old European Baroque Art (Collection of Old Masters), for instance paintings by El Greco, Rembrandt (portrait Scholar in his Study 1634) and Rubens.

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Trade Fair Palace (Veletržní palác)

This huge grimly palace is now the venue for the National Gallery's Centre for Modern & Contemporary Art. A seven storey building constructed in 1928 by Oldrich Tyl and Josef Furchs is definitely Prague's ultimate functionalist masterpiece. Not too obvious when viewing the exterior but clear to see once inside, where is collection of outstanding 19th - 20th century Czech and European Art.

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Celetná Street

This street is located in the Old Town and is one of the most important streets in the district. It is steeped with history dating back to the 14th century, during which time it was inducted into the “Royal Way”, which was a route through the city that Czech monarchs followed when they were being coroneted.

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