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Tag Archives: Excursions

Nižbor Glassfactory

Most people visit this village for one reason, and that reason is the RÜCKL Glassworks, which is a place that lets you see how traditional Czech crystal is made. The glassworks is just across the tracks from the first rail crossing you come to on the journey into Nižbor, so it’s very easy to get to.

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Olomouc

Situated about 170 miles (280 km) to Prague's east in the centre of Moravia, Olomouc boasts an attractive town centre, which has been given World Heritage status by UNESCO. Nonetheless, in contrast to other ancient and picturesque Czech hamlets, it is also accustomed to staying up late, due to its' university student population.

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Konopiště Chateau

The Konopiště chateau is about 45km from Prague. It was founded in the 14th century and in 1887 it was renovated by the successor to the Hapsburg throne, Franz Ferdinand d'Este. In the castle interior you can see not only Ferdinand's large art collections, numerous statues and pictures on the theme of St. George, but you can also admire one of the world's most extensive collections of historic weapons.

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Mělník

Melnik is a small town about 30km north of Prague and is the centre of Bohemia’s burgeoning winegrowing area. It has a huge amount of history dating back to the Thirty Years’ War – when it was destroyed by the marauding Swedish army before being rebuilt.

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Telč

Telč is a town in southern Moravia, near Jihlava, in the Czech Republic. The town was founded in 13th century as a royal water fort on the crossroads of busy merchant routes between Bohemia, Moravia and Austria.

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Lidice

Many people believe that the Czechs, when compared to the Poles, Ukrainians, and Belarusians, had it relatively easy under Nazi occupation during World War II. While this is an area of ongoing debate, taking a 30-minute car or bus ride from Prague to the former village of Lidice is a clear and sobering reminder of the extreme acts of cruelty suffered by the Czechs at the hands of the occupying forces.

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Český Šternberk

The Český Šternberk castle is situated high over the Sázava river, upon a rocky ridge, and is supposedly completely impregnable. This castle was started during the mid thirteenth century by a Šternberk family member, first of the most influential dynasties of the realm.

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Cheb

The oft-forgotten city of Cheb, tucked away in a corner of the country that few people visit, is the last Czech city of any size before reaching the German border. It is a charming little off-the-beaten-track place with a town center filled with historic architecture.

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Ostrava

Visit a city where the history of industrial revolution produces a memorable ambiance – enter Ostrava, a place packed with industrial heritage that is both original and current. The old industrial complexes either have been renovated, or are presently being renovated, into new entertainment, educational and leisure zones.

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Liberec

Liberec, located in northern Bohemia, is a historically significant city due to the legendary success of its' textile products. The town evolved primarily in the nineteenth century, when its' industrialists' wealth resulted in the development of its' picturesque architecture. These days, lots of tourists visit Liberec, particularly throughout the yearly winter ski-jumping tournaments, for a soothing holiday going to the city's massive Aqua Park, or while on their way to any of the ski resorts nearby.

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Znojmo

Znojmo is a royal and ancient town which features a castle that overlooks the River valley at Dyje. For hundreds of years, it marked a vital border between Austria and Moravia. Throughout the Cold War, which effectively turned the border region into a no-go area, this town degenerated, ostracised from its' hinterland in lower Austria.

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Tábor

Tábor was the base for the Hussite movement after the execution of its' religious leader, Jan Hus, in Prague. It was founded officially in 1420, and the Hussites named it in honour of Mount Tábor, from the bible. Sacrificing their homes, the Hussites arrived here to welcome Christ upon his resurrection. The army who led Tábor, about 15000 soldiers in total, believed that they had been instructed by God to end Catholic power during that period.

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