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Attractions

Best City Views

City Spots - From the giant metronome on Letná Gardens - there used to be a statue of Stalin here. Across Lesser Town from the Observatory on Petřínn Hill. St. Vitus’ Cathedral – If you can make it up the 287 stairs to the top, you will witness a stunning view of the whole city.

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St. George’s Basilica

As the oldest preserved religious building in Prague, St. George’s Basilica is obviously an extremely important place for many different reasons. The church dates back to 920, when it was founded by Duke Vratislaus I of Bohemia and the remains of Bohemia’s first martyr – Duchess Ludmilla – were placed here in 925.

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Kafka’s Prague

Even if you have never heard about Franz Kafka and have never read one of his books (novels The Trial, America and The Castle have been translated into several languages), you will surely notice his presence while visiting Prague. T-shirts, posters and mugs carrying the writer's image are available at every souvenir shop across Prague.

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St. Nicholas Church

This exquisite Baroque church was built between 1704-1755 by Kilian Dientzenhofer, it is one of the most beautiful Baroque churches in Europe. Building was completed in 1735, but in 1781 Emperor Jozef II ordered the closure of monasteries and the decorations were removed.

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National Theatre

The National Theatre (Národní divadlo) in Prague is the embodiment of the will of the Czech nation for its national identity and independence. Collections of money among the broad masses of the people facilitated its construction, and so the ceremonious laying of the foundation stone on May 16, 1868, was tantamount to an all-state political demonstration.

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Convent of St. Agnes

When you are in Prague’s Jewish Quarter (you should be at some point on your trip), you should ensure that you see the Convent of St. Agnes (Anežský klášter). It was founded by Agnes, who was the daughter of Otakar I, in the 1230s, but construction went on for the next 50 years after it was started. Although it fell into decay in the 19th century, it has been partially restored now and two of the churches are often the locations for concerts and other events.

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Wenceslas Square

The south end of Na příkopě meets Wenceslas Square (Václvské náměstí) - the 750-metre long and 60-metre wide boulevard. It was first laid out over 600 years ago in the Charles IV period when it was used as a horse market. Since then the square has been a regular parade ground for every kind of person, organisation or political party known in the Czech Republic.

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Church of Our Lady Victorious

The Church of Our Lady Victorious, built in 1613, has on its central altar a 47cm-tall waxwork figure of the baby Jesus, brought from Spain in 1628. Known as the Infant Jesus of Prague (Pražské Jezulátko), it is said to have protected Prague from the plague and from the destruction of the Thirty Years’ War.

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Nerudova Street

Another street not to be missed in Prague is Nerudova Street. Named after the 19th century Czech writer, Jan Neruda, this street is also part of the Royal Way that kings would follow on the way to their coronation and many of the houses which currently line it go all the way back to medieval times.

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Prague in Two Days

Walk to the Old Town Square, view the ‘must see’ Astronomical Clockand visit the beautiful Gothic Church of Our Lady Before Tyn or the baroque Church of St Nicholas. From there, head to the Charles Bridge and take some beautiful photos.

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Loreta

This pretty baroque monaster has been a place of pilgrimage since 1626, when it was endowed by a Bohemian noblewoman, Kateřina of Lobkowicz. The Loreta monaster was inspired by a medieval legend. In 1278, so the story goes, the Virgin Mary's house in Nazareth was miraculously transported by angels to Loreto in Italy and thus saved from the Infidel.

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The House of the Black Madonna

This building at Celetná no. 34 was designed by Josef Gočár between 1911 and 1912 as a multifunctional building with shops on the ground floor and offices, flats and the legendary Orient coffee house with its cubist furniture on the floors above.

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